Fall 2013

COMS W6732: Computational Imaging Head Teaching Assistant  |  Columbia University Computational imaging uses a combination of novel imaging optics and a computational module to produce new forms of visual information.  Survey of the state of art in computational imaging.  Review of recent papers on: omni directional and panoramic imaging, catadioptric imaging, high dynamic range imaging, mosaicing and superresolution.  Classes are seminars with the instructor, guest speakers, and students presenting papers and discussing them. CloudWeb site InfoDirectory Entry BookBulletin Entry

Fall 2011

COMS W4731: Computer Vision Head Teaching Assistant  |  Columbia University Introductory course in computer vision.  Topics include image formation and optics, image sensing, binary images, image processing and filtering, edge extraction and boundary detection, region growing and segmentation, pattern classification methods, brightness and reflectance, shape from shading and photometric stereo, texture, binocular stereo, optical flow and motion, 2-D and 3-D object representation, object recognition, vision systems and applications. CloudWeb site BookBulletin Entry

Spring 2011

COMS E6998: Advanced Game Development Head Teaching Assistant  |  Columbia University An advanced project-focused course in game development, with an emphasis on digital games.   Students are expected to form six- to twelve-person teams and bring a complete original game from conception to prototype to release.  Though all members are required to contribute to the design and production of their team's game, students are free to specialize in production areas ranging from level design to networking to visual and aural asset creation.  Students are responsible for completing their assignments as if they were members of a professional game development team.

Fall 2010

COMS W4995: Game Design and Production Head Teaching Assistant  |  Columbia University This course covers the entire process of game design—from concept development through to production.  Through lectures, discussion, and in-class workshops, students will learn formal tools for analyzing components of gameplay and how to apply these tools to solve real game design challenges.  As a capstone project for the course, teams of students will each design and implement an original game using the design principles covered.  The class is open to students from all schools and backgrounds.  Students with programming, writing, artistic or other skills will be able to apply them to the final project, but such skills are not requisite for participating in the class. CloudWeb site

Spring 2010

COMS E6998: Advanced Game Development Pro Bono Teaching Assistant  |  Columbia University An advanced project-focused course in game development, with an emphasis on digital games.   Students are expected to form six- to twelve-person teams and bring a complete original game from conception to prototype to release.  Though all members are required to contribute to the design and production of their team's game, students are free to specialize in production areas ranging from level design to networking to visual and aural asset creation.  Students are responsible for completing their assignments as if they were members of a professional game development team.
CTICE STEM Club Co-Instructor  |  Center for Technology, Innovation, and Community Engagement A hands-on, STEM-focused afterschool program at IS 195 targeted for fifth grade students who are struggling in science.  Topics include light, shadow, the human eye, color, reflection, animal eyes, lenses, refraction, magnets, electricity, electromagnetism, gears, electronics, imaging, and photography. Projects include building a pinhole camera, a lens camera, and a periscope from everyday meterials, and presenting a self-captured photo collage to the group.
ENGI E1102: Design Fundamentals using Advanced Computer Technologies Teaching Assistant  |  Columbia University Core requirement for all entering SEAS students.  Students learn the basics of engineering design from problem definition to detailed conceptual design.  Computer technologies such as advanced three-dimensional graphical and computational applications are applied in the service of authentic community-based design projects, using the state-of-the-art design facility, the Botwinick Gateway Laboratory.  Aligned with the technical components of the design, students develop collaboration, communication, problem solving, and project management skills, as well as a life-long orientation of social responsibility and community service. CloudWeb site

Fall 2009

ENGI E1102: Design Fundamentals using Advanced Computer Technologies Teaching Assistant  |  Columbia University Core requirement for all entering SEAS students.  Students learn the basics of engineering design from problem definition to detailed conceptual design.  Computer technologies such as advanced three-dimensional graphical and computational applications are applied in the service of authentic community-based design projects, using the state-of-the-art design facility, the Botwinick Gateway Laboratory.  Aligned with the technical components of the design, students develop collaboration, communication, problem solving, and project management skills, as well as a life-long orientation of social responsibility and community service. CloudWeb site