Hosted by:

Oregon Health & Science University

Endorsed by:







Sponsored by:





 Keynote Speaker: Prof. Bill Swartout (USC/ICT)

Abstract:
For a little over a decade, we have been building virtual humans -- computer-generated characters -- at the USC Institute for Creative Technologies. Ultimately, our vision is to create virtual humans that look and behave just like real people. They will think on their own, model and exhibit emotions, and interact using natural language along with the full repertoire of verbal and non-verbal communication techniques that people use. Although the realization of that goal is still in the future, making steps toward it has required us to weave together different threads of AI research such as computer vision, natural language understanding and emotion modeling that are often treated as independent areas of investigation. Yet, as I will show in the talk, each of these areas is relevant to dialogue understanding and I will discuss synergies that can result from considering these technologies as parts of an integrated whole rather than as disparate research topics. I will further argue that the social context that surrounds virtual humans can suggest novel areas for research that can be quite different from traditional natural language research topics.
Bio:
William Swartout is Director of Technology for USC's Institute for Creative Technologies (ICT) and a research professor of computer science at USC. His particular research interests include virtual humans, explanation and text generation, knowledge acquisition, knowledge representation, intelligent computer based education, and the development of new AI architectures. In 2009, Swartout received the Robert Engelmore Award from the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence for contributions to knowledge-based systems and explanation, groundbreaking research on virtual human technologies and their applications, and service to the artificial intelligence community. He is a Fellow of the AAAI, has served on their Board of Councilors and is past chair of the Special Interest Group on Artificial Intelligence (SIGART) of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). He has served as a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, the Board on Army Science and Technology of the National Academies and the JFCOM Transformation Advisory Group. He received his Ph.D. and M.S. in computer science from MIT and his bachelor's degree from Stanford University.
 YRRSDS-2011: Poster Session Assignment

Day 1: Poster Session 1(15:30 - 17:00):

1 Khan Md. Anwarus Salam, The University of Electro-Communications, Japan

2 Timo Baumann, Universität Potsdam, Germany

3 Luciana Benotti, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Argentina

4 Sourish Chaudhuri, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

5 Lin Chen, UIC, USA

6 Nina Dethlefs, University of Bremen, Germany

7 Wende Frost, Naval Research Laboratory, USA

8 Jana Goetze, KTH CSC, Sweden

9 José Pablo González-Brenes, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

10 William Hewlett, UCLA, USA

Day 1: Poster Session 2(17:00 - 18:30):

11 David Klotz, Bielefeld University, Germany

12 Rohit Kumar, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

13 Sungjin Lee, POSTECH, Korea

14 Pierre Lison, University of Oslo, Norway

15 Teruhisa Misu, NICT, Japan

16 Elnaz Nouri, USC, USA

17 Sai Qian, LORIA, INRIA, France

18 Lina Rojas, LORIA, France

19 Ethan Selfridge, OHSU, USA

20 William Yang Wang, Columbia University, USA
 Preliminary Workshop Program
Day 1
Wednesday, June 15th
8:00 Breakfast and Registration
9:00 Opening Introductions
10:00 Coffee Break
10:15 Roundtable 1
11:45 Presentations from Roundtable Groups
12:30 Lunch
13:30 Special Session and Keynote Speech (Prof. Bill Swartout, USC/ICT)
15:30 Poster Session
18:30 Dinner and Social event
Day 2
Thursday, June 16th
08:00 Breakfast
09:00 Roundtable 2
10:30 Presentations
11:15 Coffee Break
11:30 Sponsor Session
12:30 Lunch
14:30 Industry/Academia Panel
15:30 Closing
16:00 Social event (optional)
 YRRSDS-2011: Accepted Position Papers
1 Pierre Lison, University of Oslo, Norway

2 Timo Baumann, Universität Potsdam, Germany

3 Gautam Varma Mantena, International Institute of Information Technology, Hyderabad

4 Lina Rojas, LORIA, France

5 Teruhisa Misu, NICT, Japan

6 Sai Qian, LORIA, INRIA, France

7 William Yang Wang, Columbia University, USA

8 Rohit Kumar, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

9 Zhuoran Wang, Heriot-Watt University, UK

10 José Pablo González-Brenes, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

11 David Klotz, Bielefeld University, Germany

12 Luciana Benotti, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Argentina

13 Jana Goetze, KTH CSC, Sweden

14 Raveesh Meena, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden

15 Nina Dethlefs, University of Bremen, Germany

16 Christine Talbot, University of North Carolina - Charlotte, USA

17 Sourish Chaudhuri, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

18 Lin Chen, UIC, USA

19 Khan Md. Anwarus Salam, The University of Electro-Communications, Japan

20 William Hewlett, UCLA, USA

21 Wende Frost, Naval Research Laboratory, USA

22 Hamid R. Chinaei, Laval University, Canada

23 Elnaz Nouri, USC, USA

24 Sungjin Lee, POSTECH, Korea

25 Ethan Selfridge, OHSU, USA